Monday, June 23, 2014

Of Long-Term Travel

The rough road.

I was browsing my social media accounts when I read this particular email. It goes like this:

Hi Renz!

I know you don't personally know me but I have read your travel blog for quite some time. I have one question for you though: Have you ever considered long-term traveling?

Now, here's my take about long-term traveling:

For those who didn't know, right after my graduation, I opted not to study medicine. Instead, to make my overflowing potential energy useful (LOL in short, indolence), I worked as a freelance travel blogger, translator, video transcriber, and all other online works. Freelance work had its own perks - you get the chance to work at your own time, and work literally anywhere as long as there's a stable internet connection. I have been reading blogs of Flipnomad, Edcel, Doi, Bino, and Marcos for quite some time. They were my mentors when it comes to balancing the life of a traveler and freelancer. I have always thought of trying that kind of lifestyle, and to be with that lifestyle until I get old.

Change is Inevitable

Three years ago, I made a new blog that would narrate my travels both here and abroad. Since I was born to have itchy feet, a travel blog might be an avenue to living the life that I've always wanted, or so I thought. For the first six months, gaining an audience on this blog was pretty much challenging. You know, there's already a plethora of travel bloggers and creating my own brand was indeed difficult. I wasn't that type of person who loves to write and share detailed itineraries, who travels cheaply, or who writes guides and tips and tricks of a particular locality.

Usually, I write about my travel experience, regardless of my experience. I'd inject (but not all the time) humor to make the mood a bit light. Fast forward - my travel blog gained a number of readers and I eventually received sponsored posts.

Kota Kinabalu Sunset.

That kind of lifestyle was promising. I was earning through my online jobs but I realized that freelance ain't that easy as what I have initially thought. Most of my freelance gigs were of project based. Everyday, I'd always refresh my email for every five to ten minutes, hoping that there are emails from potential clients. There were days that I have lots of projects, but sometimes, there's none. It was quite frustrating since my earnings weren't that stable, not to mention the ever-changing algorithm of Google which totally affects my pages.

It came to a point that I got burned out of this inconsistent lifestyle. Eventually, I applied for a job that I really wanted (Air Traffic Controller), and I'm happy that I took all the risks.

In Retrospect

Traveling to different places never fails to excite me. I mean, who doesn't? From purchasing round trip tickets, to planning itineraries, and all other preparations necessary for traveling. During my travels, I'd leave all my emotional stress at home and just enjoy my vacation. Besides, I get the chance to experience life beyond my comfort zone, and to be with a culture that's new to me. Although, no matter how beautiful the place is, I'd still go home because as this corny yet meaningful cliché goes, home is where my heart is. Thus, I never considered long-term travel. It's harder than I thought. That's why I have a big respect to those people who travel and work online at the same time. Guys, how on Earth did you do that? If I were in your position, I might be browsing property portals like Lamudi Philippines across the county or looking at Rockwell Condominiums, but no.

At the end of the day, I'd always long for home.


  1. Nice insight Renz and you do write well! :)

    1. Wow mommy Val! Now that came from a magazine writer! Thank you so much! Miss you na gid ba!


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